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Archive for November, 2011

I’m currently working on Azure and web packaging (MSDeploy) support for NPanday. I want to do that on a separate SVN branch, which I’ll then reintegrate later on.

The current trunk version is 1.4.1-incubating-SNAPSHOT, and since we are about to release that upcoming version 1.4.1-incubating soon, I don’t want to pollute it with half-baked changes, while I’ll still need to develop on the trunk in parallel.

I’ll also need to be able to install both the current trunk and my experimental branch in my local Maven repository at the same time, hence I need a new temporary version for my branch. All this can be achieved using the Maven Release Plugin, in particular the branch goal. Maven Release supports 14 SCMs through the same interface; in this case we use SVN, though.

What I want

How-to

The command I need to run

mvn release:branch 
   -DbranchName=1.5.0-azuresupport
   -DautoVersionSubmodules=true
   -DsuppressCommitBeforeBranch=true 
   -DremoteTagging=false 
   -DupdateBranchVersions=true 
   -DupdateWorkingCopyVersions=false 

Lets go through the settings line-by-line:

mvn release:branch

Loads and executes the branch-goal from the Maven Release Plugin.

-DbranchName=1.5.0-azuresupport

The name for the branch to be created. When on trunk, Maven figures out to use the default SVN layout for branches and tags. You can optionally define the branch base using the parameter branchBase like this: –DbranchBase=https://svn.apache.org/repos/asf/incubator/npanday/branches/

-DautoVersionSubmodules=true

When ran, Maven will prompt for the version to be used in the branch. I provided 1.5.0-azuresupport-SNAPSHOT. Since autoVersionSubmodules is set to true, Maven Release will automatically use this versions for all submodules and hence also update all inner-project dependencies to that version.

The next four settings go hand-in-hand.

-DsuppressCommitBeforeBranch=true

By default, Maven Releases creates intermediate commits to the current working copy. I’m not sure of the reason, but I think it was because some VCS do not support branching/tagging of modified working copies. This parameter makes sure, no intermediate commits are made to the working copy.

-DremoteTagging=false

With SVN, by default, tags are created remotely. If you want to ommit intermediate commits, this must be set to false.

-DupdateBranchVersions=true

-DupdateWorkingCopyVersions=false

When branching, you can either define new versions for the current working copy, or the new branch, or both. As set here, the working copy will be left alone, and the plugin will ask for a new version for the branch.

Now I can switch forth and back between the trunk and the new branch, but still build and deploy artifacts side-by-side.

Defaults in POM

You may also provide the fixed values in the POM. And if you want to avoid interfering with other Maven Release actions, you might want to use a profile.

<profile>
  <id>branch</id>
  <activation>
    <property>
      <name>branchName</name>
    </property>
  </activation>
  <build>
    <plugins>
      <plugin>
        <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
        <artifactId>maven-release-plugin</artifactId>
        <version>2.2.1</version>
        <configuration>
          <branchBase>https://svn.apache.org/repos/asf/incubator/npanday/branches</branchBase>
          <autoVersionSubmodules>true</autoVersionSubmodules>
          <suppressCommitBeforeBranch>true</suppressCommitBeforeBranch>
          <remoteTagging>false</remoteTagging>
          <updateBranchVersions>true</updateBranchVersions>
          <updateWorkingCopyVersions>false</updateWorkingCopyVersions>
        </configuration>
      </plugin>
    </plugins>
  </build>
</profile>

Now it will be enough, when I run mvn release:branch –DbranchName=1.5.0-azuresupport

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As I’m doing some work for the NPanday Visual Studio Addin, I bugs me even more that my Visual Studio 2010 currently needs about 40 seconds to start.

Actually I do not wonder at all, as I installed every single extension I ever found interesting. But, should I now disable them all, or rather find out which one takes the most time?

I did the latter.

After reading Did you know… There’s a way to have Visual Studio log its activity for troubleshooting? – #366 via (visual studio – VS2010 loads slowly. Can I profile extensions’ respective startup time? – Stack Overflow)

There it says, that if you start VS using devenv /Log, it will log it’s acitivity to  %AppData%\Roaming\Microsoft\VisualStudio\10.0\ActivityLog.xml (for VS 2010). And it even comes with an XML that provides some output:

image

New XSL with Profiling Capabilities

So I tweaked the XSL to be a little bit more “profiling-friendly”. It will now:

  • Tell me how long it took load each package
  • Give me a visual indicator each 1 second (configurable)
  • Mark each “End package load” line red, that exceeds a certain configurable threshold (default 500 ms).
  • Mark each normal line read, if it exceeds the configured threshold.

image

image

Hotspots

image

Download and use with GIT

  1. Open Commandwindow in %AppData%\Roaming\Microsoft\VisualStudio\10.0
  2. Run git clone https://github.com/lcorneliussen/ActivityLogProfiler
  3. Start Visual Studio with ‘/Log’ switch
  4. Run deploy.cmd (will overwrite default ActivityLog.xsl in parent folder; Visual Studio will replace it after restart!)
  5. Open ActivityLog.xml in Internet Explorer

You can also download it manually (from here) and replace %AppData%\Roaming\Microsoft\VisualStudio\10.0\ActivityLog.xsl manually after each Visual Studio Run.

But with GIT you can easily get updates; and it makes it easier to submit patches, which I’ll be happy to apply.

Attention: Now you only have to repeat 3) and 4) to produce new logs, as Visual Studio will recreate both ActivityLog.xml and ActivityLog.xsl each time it is started with ‘/Log’.

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